Red Hook Criterium

photo credit: chris henry

This blog is all about field recording, so it’s rather obvious that I’m into it!  It’s rare that I get to combine a few of my passions, and the Red Hook Criterium was one of those opportunities. I love running around with microphones and I also have a love for cycling. Last fall, I rode a century ride just three days after I did all of the recording for my Metal Machines SFX library, and I still can’t tell if the metal filings in the air helped me or not. This year was the 4th Red Hook Criterium — an unsanctioned race that takes place in an industrial part of Brooklyn right along the East River.

The night of the race I headed out there with a photographer for Peloton Magazine to capture the sights and sounds. The race had just a few rules: all of the riders were required to ride track bikes, which meant there was no coasting, and lapped riders had to get off the course. That pretty much meant that the hipsters on their “fixies” were out of the race 2 laps into the 10 lap race.

photo credit: chris henry

I spent the race running around the course trying to capture some pass bys and some nice crowd reactions:

I loved the pass bys and the sounds of the hard efforts the riders were outputting:

 

Apparently, you can’t keep Italians away from a bike race:

 

If you didn’t know you were on the water, you can catch a barge’s horn in the background:

 

“Get up there Cutler! C’mon!”

 

“That’s a Race, That’s a Race”

 

photo credit: chris henry

Recording Geek Note:  Rig consists of Schoeps CMC5’s setup for MS, with the MK4 as the mid. It was all tracked to a Sound Devices 744T at 24/96.

Read More

Brooklyn Bridge Rumbles

The other day, I took a ride onto the Brooklyn Bridge on my road bike to record some ambience.  The Brooklyn Bridge has a wooden walkway that sits above the vehicular traffic and is subdivided into two parts: one side is for pedestrians and the other is for cyclists.  I’m a cyclist and  I think that, when it comes to bridges in New York, the Brooklyn Bridge is a bit of a death trap.  It is full of tourists admiring the view who constantly walk into the bike lane.  But, alas, this post is not an inditment of pedestrians.  It is about the sound of the bridge.

I planted myself in front of a bridge support so that I could record the sound of bikes passing on the right, pedestrians passing on the left, cars below, as well as whatever else came my way.

I went out with my compact rig, which consists of a pair of DPA 4060s powered by a Sound Devices MP-2 tracked to a Sony PCM-M10.  It is small enough to be discreet and not draw too much attention.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

The DPAs have a surprising amount of low end, and I am consistently impressed with what those little guys can do.  If you listen closely, you can hear the constant creaking of the bridge, occasional voices, and the familiar sound of a bicycle bell warning the wayward tourists.

Recording Geek Note:  Rig consists of a pair of DPA 4060s mounted stealthily on either side of a backpack on top of the Brooklyn Bridge.  It was all tracked to a Sony PCM-M10, with Sound Devices MP2 as a front end.

Read More

Cornet in the Park

I was running around NYC yesterday recording a variety of things, and as I was cruising through Central Park on my bike, I ran into Larry the Coronet Player.  It was an unseasonably warm day, and it seemed like everyone was out.  As I was riding through the park near Columbus Circle, I went past Larry playing and doubled back to hear him play “Autumn in New York.”  An appropriate tune for the time of year, but maybe not the weather we are having here.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Recording Geek Note:  Rig consists of Schoeps CMC5 setup for MS, with the MK4 as the mid.  It was all tracked to a Sound Devices 744T at 24/96.  I recently discovered I had a really comfortable bag that could fit my recorder, rycote, and headphones and not have the gear jabbing me in the back while riding.  It is really nice to be able to hop off the bike and be recording in just a few minutes.

Read More
about to call navigation