Feeling the Underpass

Yesterday was a day to slowly meander around Berlin. I took my time and moved without a real sense of purpose. Later in the day I came across a train underpass that seem to have it all. It was surrounded by trees, distant construction, cyclists rolling by, and several different trains moving over head. There is even a distant street trolley somewhere in there:

At first glance the location seemed like it would be relatively quiet, but once 5pm hit, there was an influx of activity. I was drawn to the location because the different trains had a lovely mid-range quality to them. Even the brake squeals seems relatively mild-mannered.


Recording Geek Note: Rig consists of a pair of DPA 4060s tracked to a Sony PCM-M10 with a Sound Devices Mix Pre as a front end.

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Marienkirche

Some folks take lots of pictures when they take vacation and others make recordings. I definitely fall in the latter camp. I limited the amount of gear I took on this vacation, but I couldn’t help myself from taking a few pieces. I’m glad I did. Berlin is the vacation destination and our hotel is down street from a beautiful old medieval cathedral, Marienkirche (St Mary’s Church). If you are into murals of the black death, then that is the place for you!

I put out a pair of DPA 4060s on our terrace just as the church bells started to ring out against the din of Karl-Liebknecht-Straße, which is a fairly busy street.

You can hear the old bells ringing out against buses, motorcycles and the general din of the city. I think it is a fitting juxtaposition since the 13th century church sits against a now defunct television tower.


Recording Geek Note: Rig consists of a pair of DPA 4060s tracked to a Sony PCM-M10 with a Mix Pre as a front end.

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Spring has Sprung

Almost ever year I toss some microphones in the window to remind myself what I love and hate about my surroundings. Some people put doggies in the window and other people put mics in the window. This winter was long, but it finally feels like spring may have sprung.

The above recording was made around 1:00 PM on Sunday April 19, 2015.

Whenever winter passes I get startled by the amount of bird-life that thrives outside my window. It is true that “a tree grows in Brooklyn,” but days like Sunday make it feel like an aviary grows here. You get a little bit of everything. There are tons of songbirds, a dog barking (probably at a squirrel), distant voices, an ice cream truck, and some car horns. It is striking how few cars pass by. Maybe Sunday is truly a day of rest?

I suspect I’ll continue to have a love/hate relationship with this city, but days like Sunday can take some of the edge off.


Recording Geek Note: Rig consists of Schoeps CMC5′s with MK4 capsules setup for ORTF. It was tracked with a Cooper CS 104 feeding a Sound Devices 744T.

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Steam Whistle Madness

I have a tremendous ability to get obsessed with projects and go down the rabbit hole. In this case it is a massive collection of steam whistles and culminates in the release of REA_017.

I first got the bug when I went to go record the amazing new year’s celebration over at The Pratt Institute in Brooklyn.[1] That night was magical for a number of reasons. Who doesn’t want to hear steam whistles in Brooklyn? And who even thought that is still possible? Conrad Milster, Pratt’s Chief Engineer, puts on this massive celebration and he is a real gem of a human being. I managed to get out to Pratt in 2012 for the event, and I was truly enamored. Conrad was kind enough to blow some whistles early in the evening before any of the festivities started:

Notice the car rolling by at 20 seconds in. You can’t hear it at all. You learn quickly that when a​ steam whistle​ blows​ it is really damn loud and puts out an​ ​extreme amount of pressure. An 18-Wheeler ​can roll ​by and it ​won’t be heard. The whistles output the kind of pressure you feel in your chest​ -​ the kind of pressure that yells “bring hearing protection!”

From that moment on I was on the hunt. It is relatively easy to find whistles but​ it is considerably more difficult to find a steam boiler to feed them. Not every whistle collector has a steam boiler or steam train in their backyard.

In 2013 I started conversations with my friend Rudy Trubitt, head of audio at Lionel about a collaboration. Rudy is always looking for new material and he also has close ties to the railroad community. After some exhaustive searches Rudy made contact with The New Hope Valley railroad in North Carolina.

New Hope Valley set several days aside so I could come down and record. We ended up recording an insane amount of whistles on Saturday from 4pm until about 11pm, and then the next morning from 8am until about noon. The location couldn’t have been more perfect.

The New Hope Valley Railroad is in a rural part of North Carolina, the tracks are set back from major roads, and it is surrounded by tall trees. Those tall trees created some truly lovely reflections for the tails of the whistles. The only thing better would have been a massive canyon, but those are a bit harder to find on the east coast. The only interference​? ​ An ​oc​c​asional cow moo.

Steam Whistles are challenging to record not only because of the high amount of sound pressure level they output but because of the diversity of sounds that need to be captured. We made sure the whistles were performed in a variety of ways and captured 6–8 perspectives per take. The iconic sound of a steam whistle heard in most films is a distant perspective. I wanted to make sure we captured those extremely well, and also provide some creative room for sound designers to play.

Some of the closer perspectives are unusual: you can hear the sound of air being ripped. The diaphragm is also on the edge here as well.

My favorites are the takes from the figure of 8 microphones which are completely off-axis with no proximity effect.

And who doesn’t like a nice stereo image?

Toot toot!

You can pick up a copy of REA_017 Steam Whistles here and a bundled product with Antique Engines here

Many thanks go out to Rudy Trubitt, Justin Drust and Kelly Pieklo for their help and support with this collection.

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The Rabbit Family And A Love Letter to Animal Bells

Last week I released The Rabbit Family over at Rabbit Ears Audio, which has prompted a bit of self-reflection. I started this little blog back in 2007 and it is still chugging along. Somewhere along the way it spawned a small business, Rabbit Ears Audio. Both of these sites are very much a labor of love and are creative outlets which I feel lucky to have. I started this blog in order to push myself out the door with my gear more frequently. I later started Rabbit Ears Audio in order to work on my craft with a deliberate purpose.

Rabbit Ears Audio’s primary focus is building collections that are not only useful, but off the beaten path. I run this business in gaps, among numerous other responsibilities, and when I launch a new collection in Rabbit Ears Audio’s growing library, I want it to count. Some of the collections have instant “sex appeal,” like Rockets, Jet Turbines[1], or Antique Engines. And then there are the collections with considerably less sex appeal like Typewriters and Animal Bells.

It is the less sexy ones I seem to love the most. I’ve written a fair amount about my love of typewriters. Animal Bells, however, is the true hidden gem in the Rabbit Family. I’ll never forget the sessions for Animal Bells:

For weeks my pal John Loranger kept sending me pictures of all of these crazy looking animal bells made of everything from brass to oddly shaped gourds. I kept asking him where these photos were coming from, but he just kept teasing me with more photos. When I saw a cow bell big enough to crush the neck of even the strongest Swiss cow, I harassed him until he gave it up.

It turned out that John and his family rented a vacation home, and the house showcases an insane private collection.[2] I tracked down the owner of the house, and made arrangements to record the entire collection over a weekend.

The location wasn’t too far from the home of another old friend, whom I dragged along to perform the bells. He performed the hell of out of those animal bells. Some of the actions include:

  • Short Rattles
  • Medium Rattles
  • Long Rattles
  • Repeated Rattles
  • Animal Meander

My favorite move is the animal meander. I’ll never forget coaching my old friend to “be the goat,” or to “trot like a sheep!”[3] We were on the floor in hysterics many times during those sessions.

I love those animal bells. There is not a ton of “sexy” there, but there is a whole lot of raw power.[4] They might not be flying off the shelves every day, but when you need a goat bell … you need a goat bell.

I’m often asked about the financials of REA, and whether or not running this little business is worth it. I’m never really sure how to answer those questions. I’m sure if I calculated the cost of my time and ran the numbers it wouldn’t make sense on paper, but it has never been about a balance sheet. All I know is that I have a collection of content that is as sexy and just as unsexy as it gets. It has been fun so far.

Lets hope the Rabbit Family keeps growing.


  1. Who doesn’t love a Jet Bike and a Jet Cart?  ↩
  2. I love collectors and gearheads. The guy who owned the place was both. He had a crazy collection of animal bells and crazy audiophile gear. It was meant to be.  ↩
  3. Do sheep trot?  ↩
  4. Iggy knows what I’m talking about. There were also times where I felt as if we were working on the set of “Altered States.”  ↩
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La Escalera de Incendios

I’ll admit I have a problem. Isn’t that the first step?

Over six months ago I started recording sound effects for a feature that required a significant amount of New York City ambiences. The film required quad ambiences from elevation; this meant that I would be spending lots of time on rooftops. My experiences doing this are partially documented here, here, and here.

I’ll admit I can be a bit obsessive. I’ve been recording on rooftops in quad since November of 2013 and I’ve only just stopped. In several months I have gathered a diverse collection of ambiences that spans the following content:

  • City Din
    • with people (light voices, drunk voices)
    • with sirens
    • construction
    • heavy traffic
  • Rooftop Mechanicals
    • with distant traffic
    • with sirens
    • intense HVAC and mechanicals

The list goes on and on: somehow I have accumulated 267 Gigabytes of raw material.[1] Soon this material will end up in a library at Rabbit Ears Audio.

A month ago I was raving about all of this to my pal Kris Fenske, and he said, “You know, I live between a Police Station and a Firehouse,” and I said, “No F’ing Way!” and he said, “Yes way.” Kris’ place was just what I was looking for: A fire escape just high enough to record specific commotion of the neighborhood. When Kris was going to bed or just relaxing with some Pinot Grigio, he would put the rig out on the fire escape and wait for the magic to happen.

 

I’m here to tell you that la escalera de incedios de Kris delivers the goods.

Police Sirens:

Fire Truck Sirens:

Drunk People:

Recycling Trucks:

Late Night Taxi:

Distant Thunder:

Those are just a few of the wacky things happening outside of Kris’ place in the middle of the night.

These last several months have been very special for me. I’ve managed to hear and see New York City from unique vantage points. I often froze my butt off[2] for long periods of time, but it was damn thrilling to see 1 World Trade from a 10 story building in Soho. It was even more thrilling to see the variety of The Empire State Building views from eight different locations. Each time I was up on a roof, it was just me, the rig, and NY. Just me and NY.[3]


Recording Geek Note: Rig consists of Schoeps CMC5′s with MK4 capsules setup for double ORTF. It was tracked with a Cooper CS 104 feeding a Sound Devices 744T. Only the front pair were used in this blog post.


  1. It is at 24/96 but it still manages to fill 3.5 Pro Tools timelines. Are we having fun yet.  ↩
  2. I tried to get the majority of the recording done during winter because even New York City has song birds.  ↩
  3. Now it has to be just me and pro tools and 267GB of material that is not going to finish editing itself.  ↩
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